HERBS - BRAZILIAN HAPE | "NUKINI" RAPÉ | SHAMANIC SNUFF

$60.00

Form: 10 grams of Loose Powder

Origin: Brazil (Pano Tribe)

Type: Mulata - Nukini Blend (known for its calming qualities)

Our indigenous Hape is of the greatest quality, infused with love, intention, prayer and devotion.  For the record, it’s pronounced rah-pay or ha-pay, and it’s a shamanic snuff that induces powerful sensations in the mind and body, including mental clarity, calmness, and a connection to the universe.
Here we present the tribal medicine Rapé that brings the ancestral wisdom, healing and self-knowledge from the tribes. A millenary medicine used for clear vision, strength, concentration and healing. All shamanic recipes of the tribal snuffs represented here, the way they are made and the raw materials used follow the standards of each ethnicity. We sincerely hope that everyone can profit and make conscious use of these medicines.
Rapé, Sacred Snuff
Rapé, the Sacred Snuff of the tribes, is a Shamanic Tool from the indigenous people from Brazillian Amazon. Tribes like the Yawanawa, Kaxinawa, Kuntanawa, Nukini and others have been using Rapé since the beginning of times as related in their legends. All our Rapé we get directly from the tribes and other crafters we work with, no middlemen involved, Rapé directly from the forest!
The Sacred Connection
The Connection of indigenous people with the world they live in is Sacred. Their Connection with their medicines is Sacred. Their medicines are Sacred and help us re- establish our Connection with the Sacred universe we live in. Our Connection to each other is Sacred, thus forming this global network of like-minded people searching for the eternal Connection to the Sacred.
Nukini - Mulata (Contains 10ml, 7gr. or 0,25oz.)
Mulata is a powerful Nukini blend made with strong artisanal tobacco and Tsunu ashes. The medicine has a nice red color and the pleasant scent of the herbs used in the blend. Mulata or Mulatinha is a herb from the Nukini tradition that has calming properties. Apart from in the Rapé it is also used for reduction of stress. Mothers use it sometimes to calm small children when they are agitated. It is, as many of the medicines, also used in herbal baths for its relaxing quality.
Nukini
In the midst of great resistance to the first Peruvian rubber boom, the Nukini of Brazil settled in the region that includes the Juruá Valley and Serra do Môa, being organized initially in small clans: Inubakevu – People of Jaguar, Panabakevu – The Açaí People, Itsãbakevu- People of the Patoá and Shãnumbakevu – People of the Cobra. Today the Nukini are in a movement to strengthen their tradition through the valorization of their spirituality, customs, handicrafts and sacred medicines like Rapé.
All of these Products are sold only as botanical samples with no expressed or implied claims for a specific purpose or use. All information provided is for educational, scientific, ethnographic and historical research purposes only.
YOU CAN BUY IN BULK FOR BIG SAVINGS!
PLEASE ASK IF INTERESTED IN BULK BUYING
The Nukini
The Nukini form part of the group of Pano-speaking peoples that inhabit the Juruá valley region and that share both very similar ways of life and views of the world, and a devastating history of dispossession, violence and exploitation since the mid-19th century at the hands of the rubber industry. The Terra Indígena Nukini, adjacent to the Serra do Divisor National Park, now forms part of one of the most important protected area mosaics in Brazil. However the Nukini are demanding the expansion of their official territory to cover a part of the National Park. Whether or not the Nukini are successful, the main challenges facing this group will be to ensure its physical and cultural reproduction and to establish good relations with environmentalists and other stakeholders active in the Park. The interests of these do not always coincide with those of the Nukini and there have been a series of conflicts which made mutual dialogue difficult, as well as joint activities to protect the area, constantly threatened by loggers, hunters and drug traffickers.
The Terra Indígena Nukini is located in Acre, in the far southwest of the Brazilian Amazon region. The state has international frontiers with Peru and Bolivia and national boundaries with the states of Amazonas and Rondônia. The landscape is mainly composed of sedimentary rocks that form an unbroken platform gently dropping from 300 meters above sea-level at the international boundaries to just above 100 meters at the boundary with the state of Amazonas. In the extreme west the relief is altered by the presence of the Serra do Divisor, an outlier of the Peruvian Contamana range and the highest point in the state, with a maximum altitude of 600 meters.
The soils of Acre are covered by natural vegetation comprised mainly of dense tropical forest and open tropical forest, characterized by floristic diversity of high economic value. The climate is of the tropical hot and humid type, with high temperatures, high levels of precipitation and high relative air humidity. The hydrography of Acre is made up of the Juruá and Purus basins, both right bank tributaries of the Solimões (Amazon) river.
The biodiversity value of the biodiversity of the Serra do Divisor National Park (PNSD) is amongst the highest so far found in the Brazilian Amazon. This biological diversity has been used and conserved for centuries by the resident population of the area, including the Nukini whose lands are home to a large part of the biodiversity. The currently autodenominated Nukini are a people of the Pano linguisic family. It is possible that in the past they used another auto-denomination. In some historical texts the Nukini are also referred to as Inucuini, Nucuiny, Nukuini, Nucuini, Inocú-inins and Remo.
As a result of contact with those involved in the expanding rubber frontier, there are currently few mother tongue speakers of Nukini. Possibly because of having been mocked and discriminated for speaking the language, the Nukini stopped passing on the language to their descendents, thereby creating a younger generation speaking only Portuguese.
As a result of their close contact with rubber tappers, small producers and riverbank communities on the upper Juruá, the Nukini have adopted many of their habits whilst maintaining their own identity, especially as regards social organization. The Nukini have a clan-based organization. The eldest members are able to identify precisely the entire patrilinear descent of Nukini families, classifying their members according to the clans they belong to: Inubakëvu (‘people of the spotted jaguar’), Panabakëvu (‘people of the assai palm’), Itsãbakëvu (‘people of the patoá palm’) or Shãnumbakëvu (‘people of the serpent’). However many younger Nukini are not aware of which clan they belong to and do not use this as a criterion for their choice of marriage partner.
Nukini houses generally contain nuclear families. Near to one house there may be others belonging to married children who have constituted their own nuclear families. Residence patterns are often associated with marriage rules, where a son will live close to his father-in-law. This rule however is not always followed and after marriage a couple may chose to live in a place distant from their families of origin.
Nukini residences are generally built using resources from the forest. Some houses have walls and floors made of paxiubão [a palm trunk] and roofs of palm leaves, especially the caranaí palm. Other dwellings are built with walls and floors of sawn planks, generally of good quality timber (amarelinho, bacuri, copaiba, cedro-vermelho, louro, or angelim), whilst stays and roof beams are made of maçaranduba, muirapiranga, louro-abacate and pau d’arco. There are also buildings with zinc roofs, mainly schools and health posts.
Descent is patrilinear, as appears to be the case in the majority of Pano peoples, with clearly defined divisions of labour by sex and age. Men are mainly responsible for hunting, gathering and agricultural activities.
Women are responsible for activities within the domestic sphere, as well as gathering forest products, making handicrafts and helping with agricultural activities. In respect of politics, the Nukini now have a system of representation by means of election. Thus the political leader of the community, the president of the production association and the representative of the group on the Consultative Council of the Serra do Divisor National Park, created in 2002, are elected.
Regarding rituals the Nukini, like other Pano groups in the region, currently dance the mariri and sing many indigenous songs, some composed by themselves and others taught by the older members.
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Tobacco snuff is a sacred shamanic medicine or tool, that has been used by tribes of the Amazon basin for thousands of years and is an essential part of their tribal culture and history. Rapé is the name for one of many of these snuffs, and it's foundation lies by numerous indiginous tribes in Acre, Brazil. Curiously, Rapé is not sniffed, snorted or inhaled. Instead, it is administered (blown) into the nostrils with a special blowpipe called "Kuripe" (self administration) or "Tepi" (another person administers). This "blow" is quite forceful and not specifically pleasant. It can be rather shocking.

The appearance of a Rapé is a grey- to sand coloured, very fine and dry dust. It is traditionally prepared by ceremonial pounding of Tabaco (N. rustica) with tree ashes, followed by patiently filtering it through a fine mesh, resulting in a dust as fine as 125 micron. The varieties of Tabaco used are not the commonly known N. tabacum, but N. rustica, such as "Corda" or "Moi" and in cases also "Mapacho". Given the potency of the tobacco, Nicotiana rustica, which is stronger and darker than Nicotiana tabacum, it can elicit mind alerting and grounding effects

The ashes that are the second important component in a Rapé come from the bark of a variety of medicinal or sacred trees. The production and choice of ashes and the exact composition and ratio of ingredients often remain a secret of the tribe.

South American shamans use tobacco as a sacred, wholesome medicine and there exists a very close connection between tobacco use and shamanism that has little in common with our western way of tobacco use. Indigenous tribes use tobacco in ceremonies, to predict good weather, fishing, or harvest, and for spiritual (e.g. vision quest, trance etc) and curing purposes, but rarely for smoking. The use of tobacco by indigenous tribes in South America, such as the Kaxinawá, Nu-nu, Yawanawá, and Katukina, is profoundly entrenched in their culture, and has been employed at least since the Mayan civilization for ritual, medicinal and recreational purposes.

Effects and Usage

Using Tobacco snuff or Rapé has many different purposes for indigenous tribes, whereof female puberty rites, initiation rites, cashiri drinking festivals, social rites, and healing ceremonies. Yet, every tribe has their own routine: some apply it every day after breakfast and dinner, other tribes use it three times during the night.

A typical Rapé ceremony involves a mutual administration by two persons. The Rapé is blown high up into the nostrils with a pipe made from bamboo or bone. The intense blow immediately focuses the mind, stops the chattering, and opens the entire freed mindspace for your intentions. Furthermore, this helps releasing emotional, physical, and spiritual illnesses and eases negativity and confusion, enabling a thorough grounding of the mind. Likewise, shamans use Rapé to re-align with their energy channels and with their higher self, and to intensify their connection with the world and the universe. In addition, Rapé paves the way for detoxifying the body and cleans out all excess mucus, toxins, and bacteria, thereby, assisting in fighting colds and snuffles. Moreover, Rapé stimulates the mind with its nicotinic content that in turn releases a.o. epinephrine, acetylcholine, and dopamine, supporting an increased focus, presence, and intuition. Interestingly, their are many rumours that Rapé could decalcify the pineal gland(1), which is involved in melatonin secretion, circadian time perception, and drug metabolism. Calcification of the pineal gland has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, and fluoride exposure, which further stresses the importance of a healthy pineal gland. Yet, whether Rapé can really help the decalcification of the pineal gland, is highly debated and needs still to be scientifically proven.

Origin and History

The beginning of Rapé is reflected in the origin of tobacco, which supposedly stems from the Americas. The first written tobacco snuff use ever reported, was documented from the Incas, who used it to cure sundry diseases and to “purge the head”. The Inca used only wild tobacco varieties and ground the roots of the plants. Already 5,000 years ago, Native Americans cultivated tobacco and were probably the first ones to smoke, chew, and inhale tobacco. Until today, America remains famous for producing tobacco: in 2010, Brazil became the world’s largest tobacco exporter and the second largest tobacco producer (FAOSTAT). This is mirrored in the Rapé use and production of Brazilians: indigenous people in Brazil are well-known for producing one of the best Rapé blends. Furthermore, Brazilian indigenous tribes were the first ones known to use snuff (WHO). Whereas, snuff was only introduced to Europe in 1500; the Franciscan monk, Friar Ramón Pané, who travelled with Christopher Columbus in 1493, was the first European to found out that the Indians used snuff and introduced this exquisite sacrament to Spain when he returned. This was the beginning of a long tobacco and snuff area in Europe.

Production of Rapé

In addition to Tabaco, a blend of Rapé is composed of tree ashes, aromatic or medicinal plants or the ashes thereof. The Tabaco is first cut into small pieces and then dried over a low fire. Then, ashes and tobacco are pounded and pulverized in a large mortar and pestle. After many days of slow and ceremonial pounding, the result is sieved through the finest cloth, and the remains ground up again until finally a very fine, smooth dust is obtained. The mixture is stored in bottles or plugged tubes, or ornameltal bottles which are often made from bone, to keep the produce as fresh as possible.

Medicinal Values

For indigenous Americans, tobacco is medically used as a cure of certain diseases, sores, wounds, and as a defense against insects (Curtis 1935) and also as an analgesic and narcotic substance that eases fatigue, pain, hunger, and thirst (Elferink 1983). Rapé enters deep into the nostrils, thereby cleaning out any residual mucus and exerting potent antibacterial effects (Pavia et al. 2000). If the body is too congested with toxins, vomiting can be a side effect that leads to a thorough cleansing. There are even special Tabaco blends (Machiguenga snuff) that are made to counteract influenza and other diseases (Russel & Rahman 2015). Furthermore, the Tabaco that is contained in most Rapé blends can potentiate the healing capacity of other plants, like Ayahuasca. Moreover, in its original sense, tobacco is even a hallucinogen. It contains two alkaloids, namely harman and norharman, which are closely related to harmine and harmaline (Janiger et al. 1973). These two beta-carbolines inhibit monoamine oxidase (Herraiz et al. 2005), leading to antidepressive and stimulatory effects (Farzin 2006).

As Rapé contains nicotine, its use increases the brain blood flow and affects the release of several stimulatory neurotransmitter, such as epinephrine, acetylcholine, and dopamine (Wolk et al. 2005, Cryer 1976; Domino et al. 2000), thereby heightening your focus, presence, and intuition and opening the body to higher communication and holistic thinking and understanding. As mentioned above, Rapé has the reputation of decalcifying the pineal gland, which is involved in melatonin secretion, circadian time perception, and the function of the immune system (Skwarlo-Sonta et al. 2003). Even though, this has not been confirmed by scientific studies, this is of great interest, given that degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson´s disease, and fluoride or mercury exposures can lead to calcification of the pineal gland (Luke 1997; Luke 2001). The calcification of the pineal gland can easily be tested by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that show the degree of calcium phosphate on the gland. Furthermore, even normal aging has been associated with pineal gland calcification and decreased melatonin production (Kunz et al. 1999), whereas children rarely show calcified pineal glands. Moreover, it is suggested that our polluted water, which is often filled with hormones and residues of pesticides, as well as food additives, excess sugar and sweeteners, can lead to calcification of the pineal gland. Pineal gland calcification has also been shown to be associated with decreased melatonin levels and a high risk for ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (bleeding), and with breast cancer (Kitkhuandee et al. 2014; Cohen et al. 1978). This risk for stroke was still higher when the patients were also affected by high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol/triglycerides (Kitkhuandee et al. 2014). The most prevalent movement disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD), is also affected negatively by decreased amounts of melatonin (Polimeni et al. 2014). The main pathological event in PD involves the destruction of dopaminergic neurons, through oxidative damage. Melatonin can prevent this oxidative damage to occur (Antolín et al. 2002), making melatonin a possible preventive treatment in PD and other diseases where oxygen radical-mediated tissue damage occurs. In sum, melatonin enhances brain plasticity, interacts with the immune system, counteracts oxidative stress within the nervous system, and a key hormone in circadian time perception and other crucial biological functions. Tools, like Tobacco snuff or Rapé that potentially promote a healthy pineal gland function, thereby counteracting its calcification and heightening its melatonin production, are of great interest and the subject is highly debated.

Application: A Ceremony Between the Giver and the Receiver

Traditionally, Rapé is administered with two different types of pipes, which are made from bamboo or bone. The first type of pipe is requiring the presence of another person, who will blow the snuff powerfully into each nostril of the partner who is going to receive the Rapé. For that reason it is generally referred to as the blow pipe and in Brazilian it is called the „Tepi“. The other type of pipe is a self-applicator and is named „Kuripe“. The connection between mouth and nose is easily established through the V-shape of the pipe.

Blowing the Tepi involves an intimate connection between the Rapé giver and receiver. Both are closely connected by mouth, nose and by breath, and both need to open and allow the other spirit and intention to enter, permitting the healing to take place. Often the person blowing needs to be an experienced tribe member, as he sends his intention and spirit to the person inhaling, which affords a strong mind and clear focus. Hence, the essence of this blowing ritual does not depend on the strength of your blowing, but whether you can share yourself while doing it and thereby empowering the receiver. These ‘blowing rituals’ are of great importance in the shamanic tradition, which perceives the healing energy of breath (also known as ‘Soplada’ - which means blowing healing energy) as a major tool for healing (Fotiou 2012; Jauregui et al. 2011).

If you are an inexperienced Rapé user, it is easier to receive your first experience with the use of the Tepi, and an experienced user as the giver. The first blow should quickly be followed by the second blow in the other nostril. This can be challenging for an unexperienced user, given that the first blow can be totally overwhelming. Still, if you are using the Kuripe, it is important to continue with the second blow as soon as possible, to harmonize the energies of both nostrils and hemispheres.

There are many different ways of blowing, depending on the intentions used. The most common blow affords a deep inhalation that is followed by a long blow that is increasing in strength towards the end of the breath. With this increase at the end of the breath, Rapé gets pushed further up and achieves the best cleansing. The giver needs to inhale deeply, enabling a deep powerful blow from the stomach that is carried outwards with good intentions.

Dose

Generally, it is recommended to start off with a dosage not bigger than a pea per portion. As it is very important to blow the Rapé into both nostrils, you would need two pea-sized portions as a good start-off. Yet, everyone has a different tolerance and might therefore favour a smaller or larger dose. Ideally, you start with a pea-sized portion, but then you need to experiment for yourself, in order to find the most suitable dose.

Self-administration is simple, the physicality of it only involves placing a small (half a pea sized) amount into the top of the applicator (nasal end). Then you connect your mouth to the other end and you start blowing. You can experiment between shorter sharper blows to longer more gentle attempts. Of course it needs to be applied to both nostrils.

It is worth centering yourself prior to using Rapé and make sure you are in a calm environment. You can use the Rapé as a tool to transform intentions and it also cuts through whatever mental or emotional field you are in. The initial experience and the strong sensation lasts for a few minutes, while the newly gained state remains for a very long time.

Set and Setting: how to take Rapé

Every medicinal plant is considered by indigenous tribes as a sacrament and as a prayer or intention. We recommend to use this sacred medicine, Rapé, in an environment that is honoring the plant for its teaching and healing abilities. Incense, crystals, chumpi stones, tribal music, and nature, create a perfect space for a meditational and reflective rapé use. Also, it is very essential to aim your mind and prepare an intention before embracing Rapé; sit in silence and aim your mind before you get started. This intention can be focused on insights, physical healing, energetic healing, or anything that necessitates healing or clarity in your life. Once you found an intention, ask the universe or the spirit world to help you through that process. Thereafter, the receiver deeply inhales the medicine, first through the left nostril, which symbolizes death. Afterwards, Rapé is applied to the right side, which represents rebirth. After the experience, it is best to remain with the eyes closed, while both inhaling and exhaling slowly through the mouth, enabling a thorough grounding and maintenance of focus. Try not to put your experience into words while grounding, rather try to concentrate on your thoughts and energy that is released by the medicine. Try not to fall into suffering or drama, but discover how easy it is to channel the experience into your heart, and notice the warrior power and grounding that provides, and how it rebalances you.

The Moment After

Snot and mucus will be finding its way out: first through the nose, later as phleghm through the throat. It is very important to allow the outward flow, as the mucous and fluids will carry your physical and etheric waste with it, so one gets rid of it. Do not force it up, and do not swallow it. Simply just breathe only through the mouth after first application. Then when things have calmed down, softly breathe out through the nose. You will see powder coming out. You dont want to inhale this powder in the lungs. After a while of breathing, it will start dripping and the nose can be cleaned. Ideally, this is done by holding one nostril closed with a finger, and emptying the other nostril forcefully, with a strong blow of air exhaled through the nose. When this is done with both nostrils, often several times, one can immediately feel a new and open access to fresh air, and breathing through the nose is greatly enhanced. After a while, the remains may drop back into the throat. It is important to bring this phlghm up into the mouth again and spit it out. This may need some coughing, but it is very necessary and rewarding. To be able to freely experience the cleaning process, it is best to be outside, where the phlegm can be spit onto the ground. This last process of spitting the phlegm, is a great final affirmation of the expelled negativity that physically and visually leaves the body and is given back to mother earth. If you continue to feel dizzy and unwell after using Rapé and eventually purging, it is recommended to drink some water, non-caffeine tea, or fruit juice and stay with your eyes closed, either lying or sitting. The water will hydrate your body and help remove all toxins that are still being excreted, and the natural sugars will support grounding.

Precaution

Rapé is a sacred medicine and ought to be used with respect and good intentions. We strongly discourage the combined use with alcohol. Remember to not swallow the blend, but blow your nose carefully and spit out the remains. Due to the tobacco content of most Rapé's, a compulsive use can lead to dependence and can cause heart disease, stroke, atherosclerosis, and other vascular diseases. Therefore, you should never use Rapé during pregnancies.

** Information on the traditional uses and properties of herbs are provided on this site is for educational use only, and is not intended as medical advice. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Many traditional uses and properties of herbs have not been validated by the FDA. If you have any serious health concerns, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs. **

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